Using .NET Event Handlers in a PowerShell GUI

GUI development tools, such as PowerShellStudio, make it very easy to manage events for controls on our winforms.

Once the control is on the form, and we select it, click on the Events button (the lightning symbol), the Properties panel gives us a list of the events available for us to manage. However, events are not just restricted to controls. There’s a world of other events out there that we can use to interact with our winforms projects.

In this article, we’ll create a forms project that downloads the latest 64 bit antimalware definitions from Microsoft and updates a progress control to show how far the download is to completion, using methods and events from a .NET class.

Updates to the latest antimalware definitions can be obtained through http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=87341&clcid=0x409 and a look through MSDN shows us that we can use the .NET WebClient class to carry out downloads programmatically.

To start this process, create a new forms project, and drag a progress bar, label, and button onto the form. Then set the properties of the controls as below. Note that properties with text controls will automatically be named for you if you set the text property first.

Label
Text : Progress
Name : labelProgress

Button
Text : Download
Name : buttonDownload

Progress Bar
Name : progressbarDownload

Here’s how my form looks.

Blog - Adding Events - Form Design

Once this is complete, we can begin writing the event code.

In our forms Load event, we create an instance of the System.Net.Webclient class. This is assigned to the script level variable, $webclient. This scope is required in order for the other parts of the solution to be able to process the object and its events.

The next two lines add event handlers for the DownloadProgressChanged and DownloadFileCompleted events. DownloadProgressChanged indicates a change in the state of the transfer with regards to the amount of content downloaded, whilst DownloadFileCompleted is fired on the completion of a download. The scriptblocks for these are $webclient_DownloadProgressChanged and $webclient_DownloadFileCompleted respectively.

The event handler for updating the progress of the download is written next:

To make it easier to read, $progressInfo is used for the rest of the code instead of $_. The variable contains the values given to us by the System.Net.DownloadProgressChangedEventArgs class instance that is passed into the handler.

The DownloadProgressChangedEventArgs class contains ProgressPercentage, BytesReceived, and TotalBytesToReceive properties. We use these for changing the progress meter value property, and also updating the text in the label below to show bytes received and the total size of the download.

The event handler for DownLoadFileCompleted is next:

When DownloadFileCompleted is fired, the label text is changed to indicate the download’s completion.

Lastly, the download button’s Click event is set to begin an asynchronous download of the antimalware definition.

Blog - Adding Events - Code

Our project code

And when we run the project and click on Download! We see this in action, with the progress bar being updated and the progress text below it also, using the code we wrote earlier.

Blog - Adding Events - Downloader Running

The downloader in action

This same methodology can be employed for using .NET events, creating an instance of the object, adding the event handler definition, and then the scriptblock code to be used.

You can find exported project code and the project files at my repository on GitHub, and a short video of the project in action on the powershell.amsterdam YouTube channel.

 

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Removing Items from Lists Using the Keyboard

In an earlier post, we created a form with two listgridview controls, and used both add and remove buttons, and double click functionality to allow an item to move an item from one control to another in an intuitive manner.

Todays post shows how we can use a remove items from a list by pressing a key. Specifically, we’ll be using the DELETE key for removing items. This will be carried out in Sapien’s PowerShell Studio 2015, but the same methodology applies to however you generate winforms in PowerShell.

For initial setup, carry out the following :

  • create a new form with a header and several items.
  • create a listview control called $lstControl
  • populate the control with a header
  • add some items to the listview control

Sample form and control layout

 

  • select the control
  • select Events in the properties pane
  • double click on KeyDown
  • Insert the following code :

The KeyDown event’s code

 

Go ahead and test it, adding an item to the control on the right hand side, selecting it, and then pressing the DELETE key.

Also, because the code loops through each selected item in the control, we can also use standard multiple selection functionality offered by the various use of the SHIFT and CTRL combinations.

Two items are selected using a click SHIFT combination

The DELETe key is pressed, and the previous selected items are removed from the list

You can find the files, if you are using PowerShell Studio 2015, or exported .ps1 file at my gitlab repository.

Additionally, there’s a (basic) video of this code in action at my channel on You Tube.

Thanks for reading, and feel free to provide feedback.

cheers,

Tim

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Using Double Click for Adding and Removing Items from Lists

Double click functionality for movement of items between listboxes is commonly used within Windows, and quite intuitive. This article shows how we can implement this in our own forms based projects. We’ll use this example with ListView, but it is also applicable to ListBoxes (ListView controls inherit from ListBoxes).

For initial setup of this project, follow the steps below, using your preferred GUI editor or code.

  • Create a new forms project
  • Change the form’s control name and text if desired (called AddServers and Double Click Demo in this article)
  • Add two ListView controls, with names of lstFrom, and lstTo
  • Add two Button controls, with names of btnAdd, and btnRemove
  • (optional) Set the Text property of the form

lstFrom

  • Add a column to the form
    • Name : columnComputernameFrom
    • Sorting : Ascending
    • Text : Computername
    • View : Details
    • Add the following items to lstFrom , with Text values of Computer1, Computer2, Computer3, and Computer4

lstTo

  • Add a column to the form
    • Name : columnComputernameFrom
    • Text : Computername
    • View : Details
    • Sorting : Ascending

Buttons
Set the name of the top button to btnAdd, and the Text property to >
Set the name of the bottom button to btnRemove, and the Text property to <

Arrange the controls to look something like the picture below :

Our form design

Our form design

Once this is complete, we’re going to start adding some features.

Add/Remove Buttons

This could be described as the ‘classic’ method of adding and removing items from lists, with arrows pointing in alternative directions to indicate the addition or removal of an item from one listbox to another.

In the Load event, we’ll set the arrow buttons Enabled property to $false, since no items are selected.

Let’s activate or deactive the add and remove buttons depending on whether the appropriate listboxes are populated, and additionally disable the appropriate button when an item is selected. There’s no point of the add button being enabled when we have selected an item from the To listgridview for example.

Now we add the code for the button events, adding to removing from the appropriate listgridview. We use the FindItemWithText method to verify that the item does not already exist there, preventing duplications.

Now go ahead and run it. Select double click on an item on the left hand column, and it will add it to the right one, and versa.

Double Click - Running 1

Double click on one of the items

Double Click - Running 2

…..and it is moved to the other side

 

The mechanisms that double click provides for list also be used on other controls. For example, double clicking on an item in a list which automatically populates a textbox with the value that has been selected in the list.

You can find a copy of the PowerShell Studio .psf form file, and also an exported .ps1 of the same for at my repository on GitHub.

A video of this is also available on the PowerShell.Amsterdam YouTube channel.

Thanks for reading, and please provide feedback if you have comments, questions, or have noticed any errors in this article.

cheers,

Tim

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